Best practices

The availability and accessibility of detailed and relevant information on accessibility products and services seems to be recognised universally as a serious problem. An enormous amount of information on assistive technology is available through literature, Web sites, databases and information centers. Yet this information often does not reach the end-users, so they are not adequately informed about the technical solutions that could enhance their participation in society.

The section on Assistive Technology products provides the link to the search engine of AT products. The latest and most popular best practices in Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions are presented below. See all the best practices.

We also invite you to visit and participate in the ongoing discussions addressing the best practices on ATs and inclusive solutions in the Market Place Blog.

Latest best practices

  • Research language guidelines

    Original title:
    Research language guidelines
    [english]
    FAST UK,
    United Kingdom,
    2013.

    FAST is keen to ensure that the language used in project descriptions held on the database is sensitive to the views of older and disabled people and avoids using terms which some might find offensive. Below is a table summarising some of the key points, and further information is available here [external link to Glasgow Centre for Inclusive Living] and here [external link to Derbyshire Coalition of Disabled People].

    Average: 5 (1 votes)

  • The Tobii Eye Gaze Learning Curve

    Original title:
    The Tobii Eye Gaze Learning Curve
    [english]
    Tobii Technology,
    Sweden,
    2013.

    The Tobii Eye Gaze Learning Curve is a clear pathway to success with Eye Control and Gaze Interaction. It is broken up into easy to understand components that lay out different possible steps for the use of Eye Control by users with different levels of physical and cognitive ability.

  • Assistive Apps for persons with disabilities

    Original title:
    Kompenserende apps til mennesker med handicap
    [danish]
    Danish Agency for Digitisation,
    Denmark,
    2013.

    List of 144 mobile apps of special use for persons with disabilities tagged according to categories of disabilities

  • Digital Note Taking: The Use of Electronic Pens with Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    [english]
    Sarah Irvine Belson, Daniel Hartmann and Jennifer Sherman,
    United States,
    2013.

    This article describes a study of the use of a digital note taking technology with high school students with specific learning difficulties

  • Opening New Avenues for Empowerment: ICTs to Access Information and Knowledge for Persons with Disabilities

    [english]
    Michael Blakemore (UNESCO Global Report),
    France,
    2013.

    The Report presents an overview and understanding of the use of ICTs to access information and knowledge for people with disabilities.

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Popular best practices

  • Research language guidelines

    Original title:
    Research language guidelines
    [english]
    FAST UK,
    United Kingdom,
    2013.

    FAST is keen to ensure that the language used in project descriptions held on the database is sensitive to the views of older and disabled people and avoids using terms which some might find offensive. Below is a table summarising some of the key points, and further information is available here [external link to Glasgow Centre for Inclusive Living] and here [external link to Derbyshire Coalition of Disabled People].

    Average: 5 (1 votes)

  • Tryb4ufly

    Original title:
    Tryb4ufly
    [english]
    Tryb4ufly,
    United Kingdom,
    2013.

    Try b4u Fly is a service that will provide adults and children with the unique opportunity to trial specially designed aircraft seating support for children, young people and adults with disabilities for use on airlines. The MERU TravelChair, a postural seat insert for disabled children and young people to use on airlines will be available to trial, together with other special aircraft seating for disabled people, such as the Burnett system and the Crelling harness and the Cares harness at QEF Mobility Services.

    Average: 5 (2 votes)

  • APSIS4all: Personalisation of Public Digital Terminals for all

    [english]
    APSIS4all Consortium,
    Spain,
    2013.

    APSIS4all is a project aimed at personalising Public Digital Teminals (PDTs) for all. It also overcomes the existing accessibility barriers faced by people unfamiliar with ICT, people with disabilities and older people when interacting with Public Digital Terminals, such as ATMs and Ticket Vending Machines. APSIS4all not only focuses on overcoming such barriers, but also on improving the experience for all users, by enabling PDTs to adapt their interfaces automatically according to their needs and preferences, and by opening up a new variety of interaction modes through the use of the users' own mobile devices, such as smartphones, as a means of interaction. The Project target the following groups: -Blind people and people with impaired vision -Deaf people and people with hearing impairment -People with motor impairments -People with minor cognitive impairments and/or learning difficulties, difficulties in applying knowledge and carrying out tasks -Elderly people -People who are not familiar with ICT

    Average: 5 (1 votes)

  • Assistive technologies outcomes and benefits

    [english]
    Joseph P. Lane,
    United States,
    2008.

    Recommendations for increasing transfer outcomes from development projects. Implications of the recommendations for manufacturers of AT products are numerous. The document helps practitioners, consumers, and family members advocate for effective AT practices especially in relation to early childhood and school-age populations, research and product development, outcomes research, transitions, employment, innovative program descriptions and government policy.

    Average: 4 (2 votes)

  • Evidence Based Practice in Assistive Technology. 2. Teaching Young Children To Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices

    Original title:
    Evidence Based Practice in Assistive Technology. 2. Teaching Young Children To Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices
    [english]
    TNT,
    United States,
    2004.

    In 1998, Schepis, Reid, Behrmann, and Sutton reported positive findings in teaching young children with Autism to use Augmentative and Alternative Communication devices (AAC) while receiving a naturalistic instructional strategy from teachers. The study was a single-subject design yielding level-two evidence.

    Average: 4 (2 votes)

Go to populars practices